DAY 4: Atlantic City, NJ

Walked a total of 13.5Km / 8.39Mi today.  Unfortunately a lot of Atlantic City is at risk of being flooded by rising sea levels.

Performance Action Path
in conversation with surfer Anthony Vitelli

Anthony, a local surfer, discussed how beach erosion is a serious problem in Atlantic City and in an effort to remediate the problem, the city takes sand from the bay, which is known to be contaminated and deposits it on the beach to try and replenish the sand; however it’s washed away before too long.

He also works as a heating and cooling technician and talked about how, after Hurricane Sandy, new houses are being required to be build on stilts; however,  the households’ heating and cooling equipment is still placed under the houses and therefore is susceptible to being damaged by flooding, which would also  result in spreading hazardous material – such as fiberglass etc.

This family had just moved to the area

This family had just moved to the area and fortunately had not experienced any floods yet. Other people I spoke with in the neighborhood said the area has a history of flooding.

Talking with Tony and Tyrone

Tyrone said he’s lived in Atlantic City all his life and more recently people are seeing water flooding streets it never has before.

Atlantic City with a 6ft rise in sea level
Atlantic City current water level

DAY 1: Washington D.C.

DAY 1 of PROVISIONS FOR BUOYANCY performance action series!  Launched today in Washington, DC – Capitol of the US!

Today I had many conversations with those enjoying the park, monument and memorials on the first day of memorial day weekend. The day started out sunny and hot and by the late afternoon, rain clouds rolled in.

Here’s a map of today’s route:

Performance Action Path, Washington, DC

 

Additional maps are post below, sourced from the NOAA’s Sea Level Rise Indicator to illustrate what areas would be at risk of flooding by a 6ft rise in sea levels in addition to what the current water level is.

A few images from today:

 

Below are two maps: one illustrates current water levels in Washington, DC and the other indicates what areas would be impacted by a 6′ rise in sea levels; both are screen captures from the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administrations’ (NOAA) Sea Level Rise Viewer.

Washington, DC with a 6ft sea level rise
Washington, DC current water levels (NOAA)

Provisions for Buoyancy is a project to encounter and engage – if you see, come talk to me.